Georgia Car Accident Lawyer- 11 Things Not To Do After A Georgia Car Accident

Georgia injury and accident lawyer discusses the 11 things you should not do after a car accident.
You’re involved in a Georgia car accident.  You don’t yet know the nature and extent of your injuries.  You’re sitting at home.  The phone rings.  You get up and answer the phone.  On the other end is an insurance adjuster from the other driver’s insurance company.  What do you do?  How do you handle the call?  You don’t know it but how you handle the call can make or break your Georgia personal injury case.
Below is a list of the 11 things you should not do during the phone call:

  1. Share personal information (birthday – social security number)
  2. Give name and phone numbers of your family, friends or witnesses
  3. Allow the insurance adjuster to record the conversation
  4. Give your opinion as to who was at fault for the accident
  5. Give information about prior accidents
  6. Give information about past medical conditions
  7. Provide the names of your doctors
  8. Share evidence of the accident
  9. Sign a medical authorization allowing the adjuster to get your medical records
  10. Agree to a quick settlement for a nominal amount
  11. Tell the insurance adjuster that you do not need an attorney to help you

We could bore you with story after story of how injury victims with legitimate claims negatively impacted or destroyed their potential car accident claim by not following these rules.  If you have any questions about a Georgia car accident case, call our office at  (762) 323-1460.

Tyler Moffitt is a Family Law and Criminal Defense Attorney who practices Carrollton, LaGrange, and Columbus, GA. He graduated from John Marshall Law School, and has been practicing for several years now. Tyler Moffitt takes great honor in defending the accused. Learn more about his experience by clicking here.

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